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Should students learn coding? Students, schools disagree | eSchool News | eSchool News | 2

This article discusses how eager parents and students are to get coding into the classroom, while few schools actually offer any CS classes.

Where do you think libraries can serve to fill the gap?

 

Should students learn coding? Students, schools disagree | eSchool News | eSchool News | 2.

STEM games for High School

I received an evaluation copy of Can-TEEN games for girls in the mail today. The accompanying letter from Carnegie was stirring with some interesting facts about girls and STEM careers. For example:

  • “The number of girls who say they like science drops 18% between grades 4 & 12.
  • The number of women majoring in computer science has dropped 70% in this decade.
  • While women make up nearly half the workforce, only 25% of science and engineering jobs are held by women. The disparity among African American and Hispanic women is even greater.”

–Carnegie Science Center

Of course, being the librarian I am, I sat down, slid the disc into my laptop, and tried out the games.  The exploration portion was great; it was informative and insightful, but if you want to really challenge your kids with some great STEM games, you want to try  some of these sites:

  • NoNameSite has some fun and challenging games including a math-oriented claw game, A boolean game, and even a “find the ball int he website” game I got lost for a while in these games: https://www.nonamesite.com/web/cs-stem/home
  • Rice University has some great games for older teens including CSI, pandemics, and clinical trials. The graphics are sleek and the scenarios are challenging: http://webadventures.rice.edu/
  • For some great medical games including hip replacement surgery, Choose the prosthetic, and stem cells, try http://www.edheads.org/

This is just a start, so if you have others you love, feel free to add them in the comments below!

 

 

Infographic creator

Do you love infographics as much as I do?

Have you thought about having your class create some infographics but are not sure where to start?

Easel.ly is a free online space that makes infographic creation easy.

It’s still in beta right now, so there may not be as many bells and whistles as you might like, but it is an engrossing way to spend time presenting information.

http://www.easel.ly/

Diagrams, Flowcharts, Graphs

Looking for a great online tool for students who need to create visual aids for their presentations?

https://www.lucidchart.com/ is a tool that works with Google apps. Students can create and save flowcharts and diagrams to their Google drive in order to collaborate online on the project.

Another great tool is Create-a-Graph, from NCES. Students can choose bar, Line, Pie, Area, or XY graphs to create and then add them to their presentations easily.  Highly recommended.

Trees Cocooned in Spiderwebs in Pakistan

Initially, this is creepy, but it’s also a unique new phenomenon.

In the wake of flooding, spiders that were forced to nest in trees to avoid the waters have enrobed the trees in silk.

Can you see all the possibilities for this story in science and social studies classes?
I sure can!

There are fascinating stories running along the sidebar of this website. It’s a great resource for current events, classroom warm up writing topics, and plenty of other uses.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110331-pakistan-flood-spider-trees-webs/