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Literature Infographics for the classroom

This is a great collection of visual presentations for language arts and library teachers.

Here’s just one of many, many examples:

Antigone (The Oedipus Plays) infographic

https://www.coursehero.com/infographics/

 

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Infographic creator

Do you love infographics as much as I do?

Have you thought about having your class create some infographics but are not sure where to start?

Easel.ly is a free online space that makes infographic creation easy.

It’s still in beta right now, so there may not be as many bells and whistles as you might like, but it is an engrossing way to spend time presenting information.

http://www.easel.ly/

Looking for online tools for providing feedback?

I love being paperless, but not everyone loves the same tools for providing feedback.

Fortunately, there is a variety of options out there and we can choose our favorites!

Here’s a handy list from which to choose:

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-09-20/the-disappearing-web-decay-is-eating-our-history#

Spicynodes: A visual and interactive option for classroom projects

SpicyNodes is an interactive mind map creator that allows students to explore any topic by clicking on the different information boxes. It took me a minute or two to get it, but the gallery includes an interactive poetry creator that I just loved. This is a tool that will work in any classroom. Check out the gallery to see what I mean.

Pro/Con website

While the Opposing Viewpoints database is still your best source for argument papers, ProCon.org offers a brief list of pros and cons on a number of hot topics, including standardized tests, illegal immigration, and privatization of social security.  Features include a brief overview of the controversy, a timeline, the top ten pros and cons, and a brief back-and-forth over selected core questions.

What sold me on this website, however, is the presidential candidate questionnaire.  Answer a few yes or no questions about hot topics and you will see a graph that shows which candidates agree most closely with you. It’s a great tool for the classroom.

Free E-Books

Looking for some E-Books to offer students?
Here are a few great links for you:

FeedBooks has a Public Domain page with plenty of classic titles from which you can choose: http://www.feedbooks.com/publicdomain

Below are a few more links.

Reference:

Bartleby.com
Virtual Library

Literature:
The Gutenberg Project
Free e-books.net
ALEX catalogue
William Shakespeare archive

Lit to Go
http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/
Hundreds of stories and poems in MP3 format ready to be downloaded.

Science and Math:
Cornell University arXiv

 

Happy Reading!