Archives

Infographic creator

Do you love infographics as much as I do?

Have you thought about having your class create some infographics but are not sure where to start?

Easel.ly is a free online space that makes infographic creation easy.

It’s still in beta right now, so there may not be as many bells and whistles as you might like, but it is an engrossing way to spend time presenting information.

http://www.easel.ly/

Diagrams, Flowcharts, Graphs

Looking for a great online tool for students who need to create visual aids for their presentations?

https://www.lucidchart.com/ is a tool that works with Google apps. Students can create and save flowcharts and diagrams to their Google drive in order to collaborate online on the project.

Another great tool is Create-a-Graph, from NCES. Students can choose bar, Line, Pie, Area, or XY graphs to create and then add them to their presentations easily.  Highly recommended.

HistoryPin

So you love the timeline project and it has been great to make the leap from paper to online, but you’d like to go even more visual?
Visit Historypin  and give it a try.

You need a Google account to sign in, and then there are a myriad of ways to use this fantastic tool.

The website offers sample galleries and examples to get you started. It’s a great tool.

More Great Sites for May

Language Arts:

Got a unit on Mythology coming up? Try Myths and Legends. This site offers flash videos of popular myths including Bab Yaga and Vasilisa the fair  and Finn McCool and the Giant’s Causeway. It also offers students the opportunity to create their own video based on a world myth or legend. Simple, easy, and informative.

Another favorite of mine is The Big Myth, a website that includes world creation myths. Visitors can choose the myth by clicking on the map. I liked this one so much I ordered the CD.

As a fan of storytelling, Odds Bodkin has always been a favorite of mine. He’s spectacular in person, having performed here in Denver at the Renaissance Fair and moving on to traveling the country to perform at schools of all grade levels.  His site includes downloadable tellings of some of his more popular stories. I  like to listen to these during my lunch hour sometimes.

Speaking of storytellers, I believe I have mentioned Drum Song Story in a previous post, but they warrant a second mention. You can listen to them on their web site as well.

Art:

This is an interesting site: Shape Collage requires a download, but you can take any  group of photos and turn it into  acollage in any shape from apples to hearts to kitty cats. I’m sure you can do dinosaurs and trucks too.

This is a visual version of Wordle and Tagxedo with photos rather than words.

Primary Sources:

From the National Archive Experience, The Digital Vault claims to contain more than 10 billion files. Visitors can click on photo tags or search by keyword. The site will also allow you to create your own collection of images or create your own movie poster using  images from the vault.

Online Contests:

Strutta is an online contest creator which allows you to connect with social networks to promote a contest. I had a hard time figuring this out until I went to the website and checked out the intro video. You can upload video, photos, and other media into the website and allow others to vote.  This one’s professional looking and offers a free trial, but does not appear to have free options for educators. It may be a limited, one-time deal.

Data, data, data…want to make your data look great on a web page?  Widgenie is an easy great tool to create your own graph widgets for embedding in your wiki or other web page. 

TimeLines:

The World Digital Library offers some fascinating visual timelines with primary sources. Visitors can browse by place, time, or topic to find primary documents related to events in world history.